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AgentOrange
09-19-2012, 08:18 PM
Ten years ago, my Bride showed up with a critter. It was a year old pup that was actually just some dog hair stretched over a skeleton. Anyone with compassion would have run over it with the car, not brought it home.

I was not amused to say the least. I like dogs, and had been searching the internet for a pure blood, large boned German Shepard with a champion bloodline. (I still check on those) One not for show goes for about a thousand.
I suggested to her the pound could find the dog a home but knew this dog was past that. My Bride would not hear of it as she had "rescued" this critter.

I took the Beagle to the vet and she had stomach worms and heart worms. She also had patches of missing hair. It was not much of a dog.

I grew up with dogs as my Pop raised and trained hunting dogs. At 6 Pop and Mom gave me a Chihuahua, Sandy. She died when I was in the Army and they did not tell me until I was back stateside.

They had to keep this new critter (Beagle) at the dog hospital a few days to try and kill the heart worms. He told me it was 50/50.
She survived.

Then she had to be spayed. How much that cost me in things not money is a life secret and involved a local government investigation into me as a person and my ability to own guns. She made it, and now I had more $$ in her than a show dog.

At the end of the day, the Bride had something that resembled a dog.

The dog liked me. She still does. For ten years or so, she has been my constant companion. She is not just smart, but very clever, I guess from the year of abuse. We are not dog/guy owner/dog now, just two equal critters. My Bride got lost in the shuffle. She feeds the two dogs and two cats a few times every day. That should make a difference. The Beagle still prefers to hang with me, and I have to admit, I prefer her company over all others.

I found I don't need a huge German Shepard. The Beagle can hear a fly move and smell things beyond belief. Her nose is amazing. Me and her and a shot gun named Blue are enough to protect this house. A team of NAVY SEALS would not be able to slip up and surprise us.

I am not ashamed to say (proud to say), I love this dog more than any person I ever met. Due to my present life style, we spend most hours together, or at least in the same area as she does have her job of inspecting and controlling the yard.

This is her yard (about 2 acres) , and she defends it. She keeps up with every inch. She is a sweet heart. Her self appointed job is to bark and threaten any critter (or person) that enters. She barks and alerts.

My job is to attack.

I order on line every week, so the postman, UPS guy and Fed Ex guy are here all the time. They know Rosey and bring her treats. She still gives them hell every time as it is her job - for the first minute. We give them cold drinks, and a couple visit off duty to fish or play pool.

A new FedEx guy came.
I almost went to prison yesterday - not jail, but prison.

My Beagle was barking as she always does when anything enters our yard. That is her job and she is very good at it.
I looked out and saw the new FedEX guy trying to hit her with a zapper.

My eyes went to blood. He was a big, tough looking guy about to hurt my best friend in her own yard.
I was on him in an instant and at my maximum piss level. it was all I could do not to ---. If he had harmed Rosey --?
He was a big guy, intimidating, but just a bully.
I am also big, and kinda wild looking. I am not a bully. I have never taken a step back from guys like this. No one should.

Most people don't have an actual confrontation level for strangers. Cops make a living doing that every day. Stress is not what cops do. Still, 30 years of handling stress situations evaporated. It is funny how that happens when it is yours on the line. All my training went out the door. I was ready to dump that asshole in the lake after I beat him to death.

He quickly was backing up the drive when the Beagle's back up arrived (me).
I am positive he will never return to my yard. If he does, he is going to jail for trespass. I informed FedEx and gave him all the required warnings.

I order every week from places like Amazon and ebay. I got in a case of those tasty gold fish crackers today.
Shopping on line is cheaper, choices are better, and they bring it to your door - I like it.

My Beagle does her job like a doorbell and barks. In 12 years here in the woods. no driver has had a problem with my critters.

I understand about bad dogs. I have responded to many houses with them day and night as a cop. In rare cases a cop kills a dog, but it is rare considering all the thousands of yards cops hit everyday. 99% of the time it is owners training dogs to do what they do. I hate those guys. Dogs are seldom a real problem and there are ways to deal with it, like blowing the horn. Any one like cops, firemen, UPS, FedEX or local mailmen understand dogs.

Rosey is not a Pit Bull, just a rather fat Beagle happy to see entertainment and maybe a free dog biscuit enter HER yard.

Attack her, and you attack me, so bring your "A" game.

Thinking about this guy still has my panties in a knot.
Rosey this week:
749

Waldo
09-19-2012, 10:13 PM
Did you get you're package?

AgentOrange
09-19-2012, 10:17 PM
Did you get you're package?

??????



================

750

TNRabbit R.I.P.
09-20-2012, 05:55 AM
I still like this pic of her showing you who's boss:

http://i251.photobucket.com/albums/gg286/TNRabbit/2011-09-15_09-08-30_0.jpg

elgrau
09-20-2012, 12:53 PM
Your story is very similar to mine and my Sandi dog of 15 years (who passed away...from neck cancer that I (personally) made a valiant effort to stop...this last February). He had an early similar "incident" with the mailman and was maced/sprayed. The mail truck and any mailman were the only things this gentle and most caring (yet very couragous) dog ever growled at and barked about every day henceforth. Early on in our "relationship" I too decided to treat this dog as an equal being and respect his "dogness" and superior sense of smell, hearing, and physical abilities and not "demean" him by comparing him to the few traits that humans excel in.... They must sense this and thus become (by far!) your best friends on this cruel Earth. I too vowed to defend his life against any and all "beauricrats".
Now have another dog who is of course a lot different than Sandi, but just as lovable.

AgentOrange
09-21-2012, 06:09 PM
My first dog was a tiny Taco dog. I was in first grade and on the walk home went by my GrandMa's home. She got in a tiny dog and I would stop in to visit. On Christmas Day Mom wrapped a box with no bottom and put the dog under. Sandy hung out with me and died when I was in the Army - run over in the driveway by a delivery truck. Pop raised and trained hunting dogs because he could. My dog was tiny. She would get mad and run along beside the big dogs, jump up to bite their ears.


Comment from Brother Wayne:

I remember that when we were young Dad cut a small doggy door into the screened-in back porch. So that Sandy could come in but his bigger bird dogs Dan and Toby could not. Terry, Frank, and I discovered ( or maybe YOU showed us ) that by placing a trail of very small ( non doggy bite sized) bread crumbs on the back steps leading into this open doggy door, we could catch birds. The birds would follow the trail of crumbs into the back porch. Then Sandy " protecting her turf " would run out of her little dog house barking and make them fly, trapping them in the back porch for us to easily catch. We never harmed any of the birds and it wasn't long before Mom found out and put a stop to it. But it was fun while it lasted. Wayne

shortcake
10-07-2012, 03:35 PM
My Max is very protective of me and OUR home. Anyone who comes to the house better know that unless I greet them, Max will have them for dinner. The mailman thought giving him treats would calm him down, but Max is too smart for that. He hoards the snack until the yard is clear. I don't want him to get familiar and friendly with anyone and then have that person able to enter my home without permission.

I rescued him when he was small and crate trained him. Unfortunately during the first few weeks I had him I had to go away over night and he was crated, someone broke into my home and he could not do anything. He hasn't been crated since. This is his home first and foremost. (Of course he shares it with 11 cats but that's another story).

He is Pitt/Shepard mixed and adorable - don't you think?

elgrau
10-07-2012, 10:22 PM
OMG Shortcake: Max looks a LOT like our new dog Apollo (also a holy terror sometimes but VERY sweet and loving most of the time). We think him to be a white/tan Lab mixed with (maybe!) Ridgeback, Boxer, Siberian Husky?? (as a touch of "blue eye" in his right eye..). Think some pics of him earlier on ths thread..nope...but there are some on the "other" site...

shortcake
10-07-2012, 10:45 PM
Max is well behaved when he is here with me alone. When "company" comes, if I greet them or they have a key (meaning they CAN be here) he tends to play puppy. So annoying, except when my son's girlfriend - then I love it cause she can't stand it.

TNRabbit R.I.P.
10-08-2012, 12:27 AM
That's one fine looking pup!

http://yardcraphome.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=796&stc=1&d=1349638485

AgentOrange
10-08-2012, 06:21 PM
Great looking dog.
I have a couple cats who decided to live here. A cat is the last thing a birdwatcher needs. :confusion:
Now I have to go out every evening and round them up because I fear coyotes. The cats follow me around like the dogs, I must be an interesting guy. :friendly_wink:

shortcake
10-08-2012, 06:32 PM
I have 11 cats - all indoor cats. My pets are much more reliable than my kids sometimes. Tax is king of the house, then there is Itsy, Bitsy, Teeny, Weeny, Midnight, Shadow, Sugar Lover, Angel and Creamy...All were rescued - Taz from ASPCA and the other 10 all rescued by Harry (HEWLEW) and his wife, and adopted by me.

He knows he is not allowed to bring anymore kittens to me (even though I ask) because I always take them all.

My youngest son, a regular Dr. Doolittle, moved back in with me recently and he brought a rabbit, Jupiter and a Cockateil Sammy.

With Max, (Maximillion when he is good and Maxwell when he is bad) and all the others here, when I say I live in an animal house, I absolutely mean it.

I would not change it for the world, and it is a good thing I am single. I can always use the excuse "it's not me, it's the animals".

AgentOrange
10-08-2012, 07:04 PM
My cats adopted me, as did my two dogs, Rosey and Tubby.
My cats are named Percy and Prancy after Sir Percival Prancealot.

TNRabbit R.I.P.
10-08-2012, 11:47 PM
I had a cat who would go for a walk with me when I walked my dog (dog on a leash, the cat just stayed with us no problem). He was very nonchalant about it & never strayed far from us. He'd stop occasionally & investigate something, but he was tons better at staying nearby than the dog ever would have been without the leash~

TNRabbit R.I.P.
10-09-2012, 12:28 AM
http://i251.photobucket.com/albums/gg286/TNRabbit/Funny Stuff/NORRIS-DOG.jpg

AgentOrange
10-10-2012, 08:17 PM
I have 11 cats - all indoor cats. Good deal, I admire people like you.

Still, 11 cats indoors is -- well ??
I bought one of those high end motorized litter boxes with the throw away cartridges. My cats go in and out and do not use it. 11 cats, indoors, what do you use?

I have 2 cats and 2 dogs. My yearly vet bill with healthy critters is high, not to mention monthly heart worm and FrontLine treatments, I would guess over $500. Food is not cheap here as I want my dogs to have the best available and in addition to normal diet, the cats demand a can of Tuna each day.

You must be rich to have 12 pets.

TNRabbit R.I.P.
10-10-2012, 10:51 PM
I had one of those automatic litter boxes for a while, but it was just a PITA.

I had 7 cats, 2 cockatiels, and a Border Collie. The BC liked to eat cat turds, so had to get a giant litter box with a cover & flap door. I used 2 of them in opposite ends of the house & used an entire bag of cat litter in each. They were changed 1-2 times per week, depending on if it was summer or winter. This worked well & most folks never smelled a thing as the cover/door combo kept the stench inside (also kept the cats from crapping over the side)~

shortcake
10-19-2012, 11:12 PM
Hardly rich, just got rid of the kids lol. 11 cats, one dog, a rabbit and a bird...the rabbit and the bird actually my youngest' who happened to move back in. 4 litter boxes, and use a little borax in it. My cats roam the house but mostly stay upstairs in the loft, which has been dubbed the pussy palace. When they come downstairs mostly it is to torment Max (the dog) or lounge in the laundry room which has lots of windows

TNRabbit R.I.P.
03-12-2013, 08:28 AM
I miss my Border Collie; they are smart as hell:


http://www.wimp.com/smartpuppy/

trav0810
03-12-2013, 10:03 AM
1294
This is my boy using one of my dos as a pillow!

Douglas
03-12-2013, 09:18 PM
1294
This is my boy using one of my dos as a pillow!
That's so cute! :applause: I'll bet you don't have to worry about anyone hurting your son!!!! :encouragement:

trav0810
03-13-2013, 07:26 AM
You got that right! These English are a really gentle breed, but they take the protection of their families VERY seriously!

AgentOrange
03-13-2013, 05:45 PM
Really good photo.

Cring08
03-24-2013, 08:41 AM
We have a yorkie, Max. He's actually my moms dog we picked up when the folks moved overseas. He's family.

TNRabbit R.I.P.
03-26-2013, 01:55 PM
I love this!
http://www.wimp.com/dogmusician/
(http://www.wimp.com/dogmusician/)
Yes, it's commercial, but it's a GREAT commercial!
http://www.wimp.com/everydog/

jjptkd
03-27-2013, 01:29 AM
I have 11 cats

You're a cat lady..? Surprised to see you here.. Basspig sure tried to give you a thrashing on the carver forum, thought you were trying to expand his market?

I grew up with dogs, many german shepards and black labs, even had a retired police dog that knew to look both ways before crossing the street,which I thought was cool as a youngster. Dogs are like little people who NEVER do you wrong and have unconditional love, work their way into the family quite easily.

I'm really sorry about your beagle Bill.. I wish you both the best.

AgentOrange
03-27-2013, 06:11 PM
Beagle in no pain, does not know she is sick, taking lots of meds. She may out live me. She is active and happy.

"Dogs are like little people" - you nailed that, especially here where I am always home and Rosey is my constant companion. She is not like a dog, but a short person.
Like you grew up with lots of dogs as my Pop kept a lot around for hunting. Parents got me a Chihuahua when I was in First Grade. Toad knew her well. She died while I was in the Army. Tiny, but lived out side as a young dog with the big hunting dogs. She would jump up and grab an ear if they got out of line.

I like Cats also. In Matthews, had no dog for 30 years, but had cats and a ferret. One cat, Tiger, lived with me for more than 15 years. He was a huge cat who terrorized the neighborhood.

I have tried not to have cats here as I am a bird guy now. They don't mix well.
Some asshole abandoned two kittens here and my Bride moved them in against my wishes a couple years back. They grew and have wiped out a million of my yard critters. The big male cat thinks he is a dog and follows me around as apparently I am very interesting. He sits near me during TV time and sleeps on the foot of the bed. He is not a lap cat, but like the Beagle, is happiest near me. My cats roam the woods. I worry about them and get them in at dark. I know most people keeps their cats in for safety, but just not possible with these two. Mostly they stay in the yard, and I have made a point of letting the neighbors know about them.
The critters gave the guys building next door to us a $100 bird feeder in Dec that doubled as a Christmas gift. The message included was this:
1346
Most in the neighborhood are from the North and see me as a long haired, unstable, old nut. I try to keep that image up. I go out of my way to let neighbors know not to fuck with my critters, and do it in a friendly way when possible.

Cring08
10-20-2013, 07:18 AM
My folks took Max (the yorkie) with them to Florida, when they moved back from overseas.

I was shopping with my wife and stepdaughter when we ran across a rescue shelter. All of the dogs were excited and rushing the gate except for one,Drew. He was at the back and so timid. We left the shelter, and i could not get Drew out of my mind. A couple weeks later, I woke up on a Sat am, and told the wife, lets go get that dog.

Drew is a retriever and hound mix.He came from a high kill shelter in Ky. He was so scared, of men especially, it broke my heart. Men who abuse animals, women, and children, are always the pansies who wont raise their voice to another man. These abusive fuckers should be beaten daily. Anyway...

Drew is now living he good life! He took to Jess immediately, and now is so excited when i get home! We have an acre yard and he loves to chase/be chased around.

We may foster another one this fall. By all means everyone, if you can adopt, or even foster these animals in your area, please do!

trying to attach photos, may have to resize and attach to next post.

Cring08
10-20-2013, 07:36 AM
20232024

TNRabbit R.I.P.
10-20-2013, 04:09 PM
http://yardcraphome.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=2023&d=1382268979

Good lookin' dog!

Your wife is cute, too~

shortcake
10-20-2013, 04:16 PM
You're a cat lady..? Surprised to see you here.. Basspig sure tried to give you a thrashing on the carver forum, thought you were trying to expand his market?

I grew up with dogs, many german shepards and black labs, even had a retired police dog that knew to look both ways before crossing the street,which I thought was cool as a youngster. Dogs are like little people who NEVER do you wrong and have unconditional love, work their way into the family quite easily.

I'm really sorry about your beagle Bill.. I wish you both the best.


I just saw this post - go figure. Yeah BP, in my opinion, has a few chapters misread in his book, but whatever. He tried on FB and failed so took it to CV.

He can try, but he will fail

elgrau
10-20-2013, 04:19 PM
"Men who abuse animals, women, and children, are always the pansies who wont raise their voice to another man. These abusive fuckers should be beaten daily. Anyway..."

Agree: I've always said that killing/beating a defenseless dog is in a lot of ways worse than killing/beating another man. The man has a chance; chances are he is at least partially responsible, etc. If a dog defends himself, he is immediately put down. Plus they have no idea why. Hurting/killing defenseless domestic animals pretty much means that person is an evil shit that needs a really good beating himself...

shortcake
10-20-2013, 04:19 PM
Hardly rich, just got rid of the kids lol. 11 cats, one dog, a rabbit and a bird...the rabbit and the bird actually my youngest' who happened to move back in. 4 litter boxes, and use a little borax in it. My cats roam the house but mostly stay upstairs in the loft, which has been dubbed the pussy palace. When they come downstairs mostly it is to torment Max (the dog) or lounge in the laundry room which has lots of windows

Update: I am down to 10 cats. My Sugar passed away on the operatng table (tumor in her gut), and now I have to take Bitsy to the vet for a tumor in her ear. Not happy, and not sure what to do. Have done my research and know it can go either way. In any event, will have to seek two new kittys to keep the house comfy. They have all begun to wander downstairs more now that they have shown Max who is boss, but Max doesn't care. I think he loves them as much as I do, and only chases them for exercise - theirs and his.

Cring08
10-20-2013, 05:13 PM
Thanks Rabbit!

TNRabbit R.I.P.
10-20-2013, 09:21 PM
Update: I am down to 10 cats. My Sugar passed away on the operatng table (tumor in her gut), and now I have to take Bitsy to the vet for a tumor in her ear. Not happy, and not sure what to do. Have done my research and know it can go either way. In any event, will have to seek two new kittys to keep the house comfy. They have all begun to wander downstairs more now that they have shown Max who is boss, but Max doesn't care. I think he loves them as much as I do, and only chases them for exercise - theirs and his.

You HAVE to find 2 new cats??

I used to have 7 cats, a Border Collie, & 2 cockatiels. It was fun, but don't think I'll ever go with that number again.

shortcake
10-20-2013, 09:38 PM
Yes. I have one that passed, and two more that I think will be meeting her - so two more. A friend is trying to get me to go to save them from ASPCA in New Jersey, but if I go there I might end up with another dog.

Did I tell you my son has brought his bunny and bird to thehouse of craziness too?

TNRabbit R.I.P.
10-25-2013, 10:50 PM
I've been watching a lot of "The Dog Whisperer" on National Geographic Wild with Cesar Millan. He is OUTSTANDING with dogs & knows their psychology better than probably any human I've ever seen. Check him out on youtube:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ANpMApPnWCM


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nmGKtby43Oc

SteveLeopard
10-28-2013, 08:59 AM
My newest family member is Opal our Vizsla. We got her at 10 weeks old. She is 6 months old. We go on hikes almost every day with my 8 year old cattle dog. She is smart, fast and a cuddle bug at night. Love my dogs more than most people. make that everyone except my wife.

elgrau
10-28-2013, 03:08 PM
SteveL wrote: "Love my dogs more than most people. make that everyone except my wife."

Agree; except I'd just change one word: Love my dogs more than most people. Make that everyone, especially my wife. :congratulatory: J/K (a little)!

TNRabbit R.I.P.
11-08-2013, 02:28 PM
Zanjeer the dog saved thousands of lives during Mumbai serial blasts in March 1993 by detecting more than 3,329 kgs of the explosive RDX, 600 detonators, 249 hand grenades and 6406 rounds of live ammunition. He was buried with full honors in 2000 http://cdn.viralnova.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/powerful12-e1383715636911.jpg (http://cdn.viralnova.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/powerful12-e1383715636911.jpg)

Snoop65
11-08-2013, 05:59 PM
SteveL wrote: "Love my dogs more thblanketst people. make that everyone except my wife."

Agree; except I'd just change one word: Love my dogs more than most people. Make that everyone, especially my wife. :congratulatory: J/K (a little)!
Hey Ed do you need my sofa? You can even use my Snoopy blanket :)

AgentOrange
11-08-2013, 06:22 PM
My newest family member is Opal our Vizsla. We got her at 10 weeks old. She is 6 months old. We go on hikes almost every day with my 8 year old cattle dog. She is smart, fast and a cuddle bug at night. Love my dogs more than most people. make that everyone except my wife.

Great looking dogs -
2053

TNRabbit R.I.P.
11-15-2013, 12:51 AM
http://youtu.be/Xw1C5T-fH2Y

I almost busted my gut on this one!

TNRabbit R.I.P.
11-16-2013, 05:24 PM
The Dog Whisperer 101: Bipolar yet calm and assertive (http://blogs.psychcentral.com/depression/2013/06/the-dog-whisperer-101-calm-assertive-and-bipolar/) By Christine Stapleton (http://blogs.psychcentral.com/depression/author/christine/)

I don’t watch much television but lately I have been watching a lot of re-runs of The Dog Whisperer.


I love dogs. All dogs. Big, little, good, bad. I am passionate about dogs and I don’t understand why there are entire channels devoted to food and shopping, which, when you think about it, is kind of messed up. But no dog channel.


http://blogs.psychcentral.com/depression/files/2013/06/DOG-300x297.jpg (http://blogs.psychcentral.com/depression/files/2013/06/DOG.jpg)“Dog” my main man



I believe in the healing power of dogs. My dearly-departed weimaraner, Belle, dragged my butt out of bed on long walks when I was in my last deep depression.


In the middle of the night, when I could not sleep, she was there saying, “Hey, since you can’t sleep, let’s go for a walk!” She slept beside me. Watched me and waited for me to get better. She didn’t give up on me.


Now, watching The Dog Whisperer, I am learning about my energy. I have hypomania – bipolar II. Even before I was diagnosed 7 years ago, I knew I had what is known as “a strong personality.”


When I am manic, I can walk into a room and folks lean back in their chairs or take a step back, like they were hit by a strong, unexpected wind. I feel like a racehorse in the starting gate, wild-eyed, pawing at the dirt – “Open the frickin’ gate!”


I never really paid much attention to the effect my energy had on others but The Dog Whisperer is teaching me. “Calm and assertive,” Cesar Millan says. Do you have any idea how hard “calm and assertive” is for someone with bipolar disorder? The assertive part I can do. No problem. But simultaneously being calm AND assertive – that’s the pinnacle of enlightenment for folks with a bipolar disorder.


I probably wouldn’t give a damn about “calm and assertive” if I had not seen the astounding effect is has when The Dog Whisperer does it. Every episode I am shown how a dog reacts to its owner’s anxiety, fear, anger and affection and then how an owner reacts to her dog’s anxiety, fear, anger and affection and so on and so on…


http://blogs.psychcentral.com/depression/files/2013/06/London-300x300.jpg (http://blogs.psychcentral.com/depression/files/2013/06/London.jpg)London, former hater of ironing-boards



The Dog Whisperer arrives on the scene and explains how the energy thrown off by the owner affects the dog. Then he starts throwing off calm and assertive energy and the frickin’ dog behaves! It’s like the dog is some kind of psychic sponge and soaks up his calm and assertive energy. Be mindful of the energy you are throwing around, The Dog Whisperer says.


I was skeptical until I tried it on my dogs. It worked instantly. As soon as I threw out some calm assertive energy the bulldog stopped attacking the ironing board – which is kind of unfortunate because I hate ironing and I used the bulldog’s demonic behavior as an excuse not to iron.
Then I tried the calm and assertive thing when I come home from work. That’s when my dogs do their happy-happy-joy-joy break-dance. One night, instead of bursting in like a high-school cheerleader, I walked in the door without a word. No touch. No talk. No eye contact. Calm and assertive.The dogs politely wagged and followed me into the kitchen, where I calmly poured myself an iced-tea and asked them how their day was.


Now I am practicing the calm and assertive thing on people. I inventory my energy and adjust it if necessary. Last week I had a big loud guy tell me how he used to be afraid of me. I was shocked, because I falsely see myself as such a sweet pea. But he was right. I’m sure I did scare the sh#t out of a lot people.

I think this is what psychologists call “cognitive behavioral therapy” and it probably costs a lot to learn on their couches. It’s a lot easier – and cheaper – to do in my living room with The Dog Whisperer, my pooches and the remote control.


Unfortunately, right now I have to go. I need to iron a shirt and get to work. Thanks, Dog Whisperer.

TNRabbit R.I.P.
11-16-2013, 05:27 PM
Remembering Daddy (My Friend and Colleague)








































































http://www.cesarsway.com/images/news/daddymjp.jpg By Melissa Jo Peltier


“When Daddy smells a flower, he doesn’t just smell the flower and move on. He goes and smells one petal. Then he smells another petal. Then the next one, and the next one, and he doesn’t stop smelling until he’s smelled every petal.”


That’s what Cesar Millan told me last week about his amazing pit bull, Daddy, who passed away on Friday at the age of 16. Cesar and I had flown up to Berkeley to go meet with the Pine Street Center, a group of researchers who have successfully taught dogs to sniff out cancer in human breath samples. When I say successful, I mean a 90% success rate of detecting breast, lung, pancreatic and ovarian cancer at stages 1,2,3, 4 and even stage zero. Yes, the dogs can detect cancer even before modern medicine is capable of discerning it. One of the scientists there told me, “Science has nothing anywhere near as accurate as a dog’s nose.”


We are working on our fifth book together, Cesar and I, and for it, Cesar wants to meet with people at the cutting edge of dog training (what Cesar does on the show Dog Whisperer, of which I am one of the executive producers, isn’t training at all. So many of his critics get that so wrong. It’s rehabilitation – he focuses his “training” efforts on the owners, teaching them to take responsibility for what they are communicating to the dog). What we learned at Pine Street, of course, is the clinic dogs weren’t really “trained” to smell cancer. They already knew how to do it. What the Pine Street folks taught the dogs was how to tell us when they smelled cancer. This is the kind of dynamic that fascinates Cesar right now. He believes that the future of dog training won’t be finding new ways to teach dogs tricks or human words like “sit, stay, come” and “heel.” It’s really training ourselves how to recognize and utilize the miraculous instincts and abilities that dogs already possess. Really, in Cesar’s mind, our dogs have always had much more to teach us than we to teach them.


I’ve been blessed to have known and loved and worked with Daddy since Cesar first came into the lives of my MPH Entertainment partners and myself back in 2004. In fact, Daddy came with Cesar the very first time the soon to be christened Dog Whisperer walked into our offices. Cesar and his wife and business partner, Ilusion, came into our conference room together, followed off-leash by a tough looking golden pit bull with what seemed like a tiger-sized head. While his appearance indicated ferocity, his demeanor was mellow, gentle and tolerant. During our first conversation, Daddy crawled under the conference table and lay down at my feet. I kicked off my shoe and started rubbing his belly, a distraction he enjoyed so much he soon stretched out on his back to get the full tummy rub treatment. We didn’t know it then, but Cesar always brought Daddy along to business meetings, in order to silently observe his behavior. Cesar trusted Daddy’s innate reaction to people and animals implicitly. If Daddy had reacted negatively to us, Cesar told us later, he simply wouldn’t have done business with us. Flocks of other producers had visited him at his Dog Psychology Center and all it took for Cesar to decide to send them away was to notice a negative reaction from his pack. “You can lie to a human, but you can’t lie to a dog,” he always says.
http://www.cesarsway.com/images/packprofiles/daddy01.jpg Working with Cesar over the years and traveling to direct Dog Whisperer episodes now and then, I’ve had the amazing experience of watching Daddy at work. Just like the seeing-eye dog that knows its job is to guide its blind owner across the street, Daddy somehow understood that his job was to help other dogs that didn’t have his serenity, wisdom and balance. A famous science-based animal trainer I interviewed the other day said to me, “I don’t know what you mean by balance.” It may be tricky to explain in words, but I know that anyone who had the good fortune to meet Daddy would understand exactly what Cesar means when he uses this term. Daddy exuded balance from every pore, and I have personally watched the mere fact of his presence turn a fearful Vizla into a courageous walker; a lazy bull terrier into a playful puppy; an aggressive German Shepherd guard dog into a laid-back friend. Cesar learned early in the Dog Whisperer’s history that if a particular case seemed to stump him a little, it was time to call in Daddy to get his insight. By raising Daddy in a loving, peaceful yet challenge-filled environment, around all manner of different dogs and people, Cesar succeeded in channeling the dog’s powerful pit bull energy into something few people think that the breed is capable of: Daddy grew up to be a teacher, a guru, a healer.


About two years ago, Cesar recognized that Daddy – though no less enthusiastic about his canine life’s work - was beginning to slow down noticeably. He took the opportunity to let Daddy himself choose a pit bull puppy who would become his successor, as Cesar’s right hand dog and the new ambassador of this much- maligned breed. I’ve watched this blue pit puppy, “Junior”, blossom from a winsome pup to an energetic adolescent with rippling muscles and forelegs of steel, under Daddy’s tutelage. Having Junior as his adopted “grandson” also gave Daddy an added purpose in life and brought out the still-active puppy in him during his waning years. I saw Junior today, just a day after Daddy’s departure, up at Cesar’s ranch, happily digging in the dirt and leaping about with Cesar’s other dogs. I’m sure he’s got some grieving to do, but like his mentor, his default setting is balance. I have no doubt that he will take up Daddy’s mantle with pride and purpose.


http://www.cesarsway.com/images/packprofiles/daddy03.jpg
Daddy’s passing Friday wasn’t totally unexpected by those of us who loved him. While we were traveling to Pine Street, Cesar told me that Daddy’s health had been deteriorating rapidly over the past couple weeks since I had last seen him. There was no one thing that was wrong – it was just that extreme old age had taken its toll on his once strong and sturdy body. He was totally deaf, nearly blind, and could barely walk due to crippling arthritis that targeted his front and back legs. For years, Cesar had exercised him in the pool and given him weekly massage and acupuncture treatments to keep that affliction at bay, but even those therapies weren’t helping anymore. Daddy was also showing signs of a canine version of dementia. Watching a fine specimen of dog like Daddy fade away is a powerful reminder that all beings on this planet – even the strongest and fittest among us - are only here on a lease, one that eventually will run out. The last time I saw Daddy, he was able to recognize me and wag his tail, but there wasn’t a lot of passion in it.

There are some animals (and a few special humans) that seem to bring with them into this world inexplicably magnetic souls. It’s like they know they are a part of something larger than all of us, and if we’re lucky to be around them and remain open, we too can taste a bit of that eternity. Whenever I was around Daddy, I felt a palpable sense of peace and serenity. Up at Cesar’s ranch today, I swear I could still feel his presence in the cool, humid air. He will, of course, live on through his television appearances, some of which are in episodes that haven’t even aired yet. Just a couple months ago during a filming, he coaxed a fearful cell-phone search dog out from its hiding place under a desk - just by showing up and offering to lead. He wasn’t “trained” to do this – he just knew. Even in his infirmity, he still carried that magic with him, everywhere he went.


The fact that Daddy never passed a flower without smelling every single petal is a metaphor for his long – in dog years, anyway – life. Rest in peace, my pit bull friend. You changed my life, and I feel so blessed to have known you.


Read more: http://www.cesarsway.com/news/remembering-daddy#ixzz2kqlm3XmL

TNRabbit R.I.P.
11-21-2013, 12:00 AM
2071

The Beagles.....Waggy Road

Cring08
11-24-2013, 08:41 AM
While on vacation, we had 5 guard dogs that lived on the property. They were awesome! Barked when anyone came near, and escorted us on our walks on the beach. The wife and I hated to leave these guys!

2077

TNRabbit R.I.P.
11-27-2013, 01:03 AM
This is excellent!

http://distractify.com/fun/humor/scout-is-the-single-most-composed-dog-on-the-planet/

TNRabbit R.I.P.
12-07-2013, 06:47 AM
Priceless!


http://youtu.be/S7znI_Kpzbs

TNRabbit R.I.P.
01-12-2014, 02:10 AM
Smart beagle!


http://youtu.be/_ym0rxisOpw

Snoop65
01-17-2014, 09:41 PM
These guys don't want a bath!!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V4LnorVVxfw

Chuck Farley
12-27-2018, 01:57 PM
My friend just got this new puppy. Her husband is into bird dogs and presently has three, but Mary wanted a little house dog. I think she made a good choice.
6399
The Havanese (singular or plural, the name’s the same) is from the ancient Bichon family of little white dogs and claims such breeds as the Bichon Frise and Maltese as probable common ancestors. Since the earliest days of human civilization, lively lapdogs of this type were bartered around the world by seafaring merchants. In all times and places, small, clever dogs that did no useful work were among the possessions that set royals and aristocrats apart from lower social classes.
The native lapdog of Cuba’s aristocrats and wealthy planters was the Havanese, named for the capital city of Havana, where the breed gained greatest favor. Depending on the source, the breed’s forerunners were said to be brought to the island nation by Italian sea captains or by the Spaniards charged with colonizing the New World in the 1600s.
During its approximately 300 years in the lap of Cuban luxury, the breed was refined, perhaps with Poodle crosses, into today’s Havanese, once called the Blanquito de la Habana (Havana Silk Dog). The pivotal event in the breed’s history came in 1959, with the Communist takeover of Cuba. Many well-heeled Cubans fleeing Fidel Castro’s revolution brought their little dogs with them to America. With the help of American fanciers, the refugees preserved and perpetuated the Havanese. The breed is now a popular choice for discerning pet owners around the world.
Among celebrity Havanese owners were two of the world’s most celebrated writers. Ernest Hemingway fell under the Havanese spell during his 20 years in Cuba. About a hundred years earlier, Charles Dickens owned a tiny Havanese named Tim.