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Thread: Competition for Nest Boxes

  1. #1
    MSG
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Toccoa & Clayton, GA
    Posts
    584

    Competition for Nest Boxes

    Once again this year, I had some fighting between Bluebirds and Tree Swallows. I have two bluebird boxes and again I ended up with a Bluebird nest in one and Tree Swallows in the other but it took several days for them to sort it out.

    Yesterday, I had some disturbance going on at the Tree Swallow nest box when some other Swallows invaded and fighting began. I think the invaders were likely female tree swallows . The original owners of the nest prevailed and today it was all quiet and I saw the male with his head protruding out of the box most of the day guarding the box. Tree Swallows are beautiful birds, especially the male, and they are big time insect eaters on the fly.

    Another threat to Tree Swallows is the House Sparrow. Is it OK to kill a House Sparrow? Well, the guy in this video loves his Tree Swallows and he guards them using lethal force with his air rifle.

    https://tw.forumosa.com/t/defending-...wallows/171318

  2. #2
    SFC Mike Kelly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Clarkesville, Ga
    Posts
    455
    That guy meant business. I shot an innocent bird with my BB gun when I was 8 or 9 years old. I still feel bad about that. Maybe that guy needs a cat.

  3. #3
    MSG
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Toccoa & Clayton, GA
    Posts
    584
    So far as I know, I have not yet had any problems with House Sparrows. Lots of birders hate them because they take over Bluebird nests and sometimes kill Bluebirds and others. Lots of information online about the problem. They are classified as invasive birds and are not protected by the migratory bird treaty act.

    Website Bird Watching HQ's number one control recommendation is to kill or trap them.

    Another says: "In extreme cases of house sparrow aggression or entrenched populations, it may be necessary to resort to stronger control techniques that actively reduce the house sparrow population. Options include shooting house sparrows, trapping birds to kill them (relocation is not desirable because that simply moves the problem to another region), and destroying eggs or nests to prevent population growth. Before attempting aggressive controls, however, it is wise to consult a wildlife management office, as not not all tactics may be legal or suitable in certain areas. Any aggressive techniques should also be carefully monitored so they do not impact other species that are protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.

    If it came down to protecting my Bluebirds and Tree Swallows, I would gladly kill House Sparrows if they ever become a problem.

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